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About us


At a time when nutrition headlines are saturated with information about fat and sugar, CASH (Consensus Action on Salt and Health) has done a great job at getting us talking about salt, again. This is important because although we need a little bit of salt in our diets, too much puts us at an increased risk of high blood pressure, which is a major cause of strokes and heart attacks. Their National Salt Awareness Week had hospitals, schools, community groups and health professionals engaging in activities, displaying key information and talking and tweeting about salt. View some of the conversations on Twitter by following @cashsalt and using #nationalsaltawarenessweek. I attended their Parlimentary reception at The House of Commons to hear the latest on salt from other health professionals, academics, members of food industry and chefs. Here are some of the key updates: Want to learn more? How much is too much? Ready to sort out your salt intake?

Here’s how: Keep the table salt away from the table: Most of the salt we consume is already in the foods we eat. So avoid adding additional salt to your food, including whilst cooking. If you’re worried about the food not tasting the same, gradually reduce the amount you add and your taste buds will adapt. They are not set for life! Limit foods that are high in salt, like: Read the label to see how much salt is added to packaged and processed foods, like these: Get technical about your takeaway and be restaurant ready: We are eating foods cooked outside of the home more and more. When eating out, try to choose somewhere that gives you the nutrition information of the food they serve to help you make educated choices. Only choose foods that you know are high in salt (see list above) occasionally, or ask for a smaller portion. And don’t forget to request that less salt is added during cooking.

Check out CASH’s ‘Less salt, please’ campaign and some more ideas, here. Good luck!